What is Anarchism?

Anarchism is a way of understanding — and changing — the world we live in, to create a society in which people freely co-operate together as equals. Anarchists understand that we all can guide our own lives and communities much better than bosses, politicians, or bureaucrats — no matter if they’re in government buildings, corporate headquarters, or the office down the hall. Anarchists are opposed to all systems that attempt to exploit, control, or discriminate against others, like capitalism, government, racism, and sexism. Above all we insist on acting upon values which most people already hold dear: freedom, participation, solidarity, cooperation, and democracy.

Anarchism is a way of understanding — and changing — the world we live in, to create a society in which people freely co-operate together as equals.

Anarchists understand that we all can guide our own lives and communities much better than bosses, politicians, or bureaucrats — no matter if they’re in government buildings, corporate headquarters, or the office down the hall.

Anarchists are opposed to all systems that attempt to exploit, control, or discriminate against others, like capitalism, government, racism, and sexism. Above all we insist on acting upon values which most people already hold dear: freedom, participation, solidarity, cooperation, and democracy.

An anarchist society means
people directly affected make decisions,
not professional politicians.

What might this look like?

For our workplaces, it means that the people who work will decide together what is produced and how. No bosses needed.

For our natural world, it means communities will decide how and whether local development occurs and how energy is produced. Communities and bioregions will cooperate and coordinate together to protect and nurture large-scale resources like lakes, rivers, and forests.

For education, students and teachers will work together to decide how and what lessons are learned and how schools are run, or if “schools” as separate institutions should even exist.

For health care: doctors, nurses, and health care workers will determine the best way to practice medicine, with accountability to their patients and the support of the communities around them. Government and corporate bureaucrats not welcome.

For safety and justice, the elimination of poverty caused by capitalism means there will be far less crime than we see now.
To the extent that crime remains, communities will work to resolve conflict and assist and restore victims — as well as rehabilitate and hold accountable those who harm others.

In all spheres of life, decisions will be made and coordinated across and between local and regional groups, to achieve economies of scale, ensure freedom of travel, and preserve and maintain continent-spanning ecosystems.



Sometimes even those who recognize all of the problems of our current economic and political system will still throw up their hands and say, “This system is horrible, but what’s the alternative?”


Anarchism is a very possible, and dare we say beautiful, way to organize our society together. So let's get started.